Richard NealRichard Neal – MA1

Current Position: US Representative for MA House District 1 since 1989
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Mayor Springfield from 1983 – 1989

Other Positions:  
Chair, Committee on Ways and Means
Chair,  Joint Committee on Taxation

Featured Quote: 
In the first #200Days, @HouseDemocrats have taken decisive action to crush the coronavirus and defeat the economic crisis – including by passing the life-saving #AmericanRescuePlan, which put shots in arms, workers back in jobs, money in pockets and children back in school!

Featured Video: 
Congressman Richard Neal chats about his new position as House Ways and Means Committee chairman

Source: Government page

We will now turn to our first order of business, Subtitle A, Budget Reconciliation Legislative Recommendations Relating to Universal Paid Family and Medical Leave.  This is one of the most profoundly important pieces of this entire package.

Throughout the COVID crisis, our country’s lack of universal paid leave inflicted an extra layer of stress and heartache on American families during an already excruciating time.

But this is not a new problem. Long before the pandemic struck, American workers have lived in fear that an injury, illness, sick family member, or even the arrival of a new baby might push them into financial crisis. Without paid leave, any one of these – or myriad other – scenarios could result in extended time off the job without money coming in the door.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MA House District 1 since 1989
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): Mayor Springfield from 1983 – 1989

Other Positions:  
Chair, Committee on Ways and Means
Chair,  Joint Committee on Taxation

Featured Quote: 
In the first #200Days, @HouseDemocrats have taken decisive action to crush the coronavirus and defeat the economic crisis – including by passing the life-saving #AmericanRescuePlan, which put shots in arms, workers back in jobs, money in pockets and children back in school!

Featured Video: 
Congressman Richard Neal chats about his new position as House Ways and Means Committee chairman

Source: Government page

News

We will now turn to our first order of business, Subtitle A, Budget Reconciliation Legislative Recommendations Relating to Universal Paid Family and Medical Leave.  This is one of the most profoundly important pieces of this entire package.

Throughout the COVID crisis, our country’s lack of universal paid leave inflicted an extra layer of stress and heartache on American families during an already excruciating time.

But this is not a new problem. Long before the pandemic struck, American workers have lived in fear that an injury, illness, sick family member, or even the arrival of a new baby might push them into financial crisis. Without paid leave, any one of these – or myriad other – scenarios could result in extended time off the job without money coming in the door.

Twitter

About

Richard Neal 2

Source: Government page

Richard E. Neal was born in Worcester, Massachusetts and was raised and educated in the City of Springfield. He is a graduate of American International College, where he received his Bachelor’s Degree in Political Science. He received his Masters Degree in Public Administration from the Barney School of Business and Public Administration at the University of Hartford.

Congressman Neal was first elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1988 and served his first two terms on the House Banking Committee before joining the Ways and Means Committee in 1993. In January 2019, Congressman Neal was elected by his colleagues to assume the esteemed position of Chairman, marking the first time since 1875 that a representative from Massachusetts had done so.

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Congressman Neal and the Ways and Means Committee worked tirelessly to bring relief to the American people.

The first relief bill, the CARES Act, included several provisions Ways and Means Committee Democrats secured including: federal unemployment compensation, economic assistance payments, and telehealth flexibility. This bill singlehandedly saved the American economy.

In the American Rescue Plan Act, the Ways and Means Committee was responsible for nearly $1 billion of the $1.9 trillion package. Under Chairman Neal’s leadership, the bill put more money directly into people’s pockets, helping them better afford child care and health coverage. It also shored up the hard-earned retirement security for millions of Americans nationwide.

Chairman Neal is the dean of both the Massachusetts Delegation and the New England Congressional Delegation. He is an At-Large Whip for the House Democrats and is the Democratic Leader of the Friends of Ireland Caucus.

He is a long-time guest lecturer at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst and a National Trustee of John F. Kennedy Library in Boston. Congressman Neal has received many awards and honorary degrees in his career including an Honorary Degree of Humane Letters from Mount Holyoke College where he is a former trustee, and an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws from Ulster University in Northern Ireland.

Prior to his time in Congress, Neal was a high school teacher, member of the Springfield City Council, and Mayor of the City of Springfield from 1984 to 1988.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills 

Caucuses 

  • Congressional Arts Caucus
  • Afterschool Caucuses
  • U.S.-Japan Caucus
  • New England Congressional Caucus (Co-chair)
  • Friends of Ireland

Offices

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, YouTube, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

VoteSmart – National Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Richard Edmund Neal (born February 14, 1949) is an American politician serving as the U.S. representative for Massachusetts’s 1st congressional district since 1989. The district, numbered as the 2nd district from 1989 to 2013, includes Springfield, West Springfield, Pittsfield, Holyoke, Agawam, Chicopee and Westfield, and is much more rural than the rest of the state. A member of the Democratic Party, Neal has been the dean of Massachusetts’s delegation to the United States House of Representatives since 2013, and he is also the dean of the New England House delegations.[1][2]

Neal was president of the Springfield City Council from 1979 to 1983, serving as mayor of Springfield from 1983 to 1989. He was nearly unopposed when he ran for the House of Representatives in 1988, and took office in 1989.

Neal has chaired the House Ways and Means Committee since 2019 and chaired the Subcommittee on Select Revenue Measures.[3] He has also dedicated much of his career to U.S.–Ireland relations and maintaining American involvement in the Northern Ireland peace process, for which he has won several acclamations. He has a generally liberal voting record, but is considered a moderate on such issues as abortion and trade. In January 2020, Neal was inducted into the Irish American Hall of Fame.[4]

Early life, education, and academic career

Richard Edmund Neal was born in 1949, in Worcester, Massachusetts, the oldest of three children of Mary H. (Garvey) and Edmund John Neal. He and his two younger sisters were raised in Springfield by their mother, a housewife, and their father, a custodian at MassMutual. Neal’s maternal grandparents were from Northern Ireland and his paternal grandparents were from Ireland and Cornwall, England.[5] Neal’s mother died of a heart attack when he was 13, and he was attending Springfield Technical High School when his father, an alcoholic, died. Neal and his two younger sisters moved in with their grandmother and later their aunt, forced to rely on Social Security checks as they grew up.[6][7][8]

After graduating from high school, Neal attended Holyoke Community College in Holyoke, Massachusetts, and then American International College in Springfield, with the assistance of survivor’s benefits. He graduated in 1972 with a Bachelor of Arts in political science. He then attended the University of Hartford‘s Barney School of Business and Public Administration, graduating in 1976 with a Master of Arts in public administration.[7][9][10] Early in his career Neal taught history at Cathedral High School.[8]

Local government

Neal began his political career as co-chairman of Democratic presidential candidate George McGovern‘s 1972 election campaign in Western Massachusetts.[11] In 1973 he became an assistant to Springfield Mayor William C. Sullivan. Neal was elected to the Springfield City Council in 1978 and was named President of the City Council in 1979.[9] The following year he was named as a delegate for presidential candidate Ted Kennedy at the 1980 Democratic National Convention.[12] While a city councilor, Neal taught history at Cathedral High School, and gave lectures at Springfield College, American International College, Springfield Technical Community College, and Western New England College.[13]

In 1983, Neal made plans to challenge Theodore Dimauro, the Democratic incumbent mayor of Springfield. The pressure led Dimauro to retire and Neal was elected mayor. Neal was reelected in 1985 and 1987.[11] As mayor, Neal oversaw a period of significant economic growth, with over $400 million of development and investment in the city, and a surplus in the city budget. He worked to strengthen Springfield’s appearance, pushing to revive and preserve the city’s historic homes and initiating a Clean City Campaign to reduce litter.[13][14]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

The 2nd congressional district of Massachusetts from 2003 to 2013

Neal ran for the United States House of Representatives in Massachusetts’s 2nd congressional district in 1988 after 18-term Democratic incumbent Edward Boland retired. Boland had alerted Neal of his impending retirement, giving him a head start on his campaign. Neal raised $200,000 in campaign contributions and collected signatures across the district before the retirement was formally announced.[15] He was unopposed in the Democratic primary, and his only general election opponent was Communist Party candidate Louis R. Godena, whom he defeated with over 80 percent of the vote.[16]

Neal has won reelection every two years since. Former Springfield mayor Theodore Dimauro, reflecting sentiments that Neal had an unfair advantage in the previous election, ran as a challenger in the 1990 Democratic primary. Dimauro’s campaign was sullied by a false rumor he spread about the Bank of New England‘s financial situation, and Neal won the primary easily.[15] He was unopposed in the general election, winning 68 percent of the vote.[17] In 1992, his popularity was threatened by the House banking scandal, in which he had made dozens of unpenalized overdrafts at the House Bank.[15] After narrowly defeating two Democratic opponents, he was challenged by Republican Anthony W. Ravosa Jr., and Independent Thomas R. Sheehan. Neal won with 53 percent of the vote.[18]

In a Springfield Union-News poll taken in mid-October 1994, Neal was ahead of John Briare by only 6 percentage points. Neal went on to spend nearly $500,000 in the last two weeks of the campaign to defeat Briare. The 1994 general election also featured a third-party candidate, Kate Ross, who received 6% of the vote. With blanks, Neal actually received only 51% of the vote in 1994.[19]

Since 1994 Neal has had little electoral opposition. He was challenged by Mark Steele in 1996 and easily dispatched him with 71 percent of the vote[20][21] and ran unopposed in 1998. In 2000 he won the Democratic primary against Joseph R. Fountain, who challenged Neal’s positions as “anti-choice” and “anti-gun”.[22] Neal had been unopposed in the general election since 1996, but faced Republican opponent Tom Wesley[23] in the 2010 U.S. congressional elections, which Neal won by a margin of 57% to 43%.

For his first 12 terms in Congress, Neal represented a district centered on Springfield and stretching as far east as the southern and western suburbs of Worcester. When Massachusetts lost a congressional district after the 2010 census, the bulk of Neal’s territory, including his home in Springfield, was merged with the 1st district, held by fellow Democrat John Olver. While it retained Olver’s district number, it was geographically and demographically more Neal’s district; it now covered almost all of the Springfield metropolitan area. The prospect of an incumbent vs. incumbent contest was averted when Olver retired. The new 1st was no less Democratic than the old 2nd, and Neal was reelected without much difficulty in 2012, 2014 and 2016.

In the 2018 Democratic primary, Neal defeated Springfield attorney Tahirah Amatul-Wadud, 70.7% to 29.3%.[24] In the final days of the campaign Neal had $3.1 million in the bank to Amatul-Wadud’s $20,000.[24]

Holyoke mayor Alex Morse unsuccessfully challenged Neal in the 2020 Democratic primary election.[25] In the 2020 election, Neal received the most PAC money of any candidate: $3.1 million out of his $4.9 million total raised.[26]

Tenure

Neal has a generally liberal political record. He was given a 100 percent “Liberal Quotient” by Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) for his 2008 voting record, and the organization named him one of the year’s “ADA Heroes”.[27] He was given an 8.19 percent “Lifetime Rating” by the American Conservative Union (ACU) based on his votes from 1989 to 2009.[28] In the 110th United States Congress Neal voted with the Democratic Party leadership on 98.9 percent of bills;[29] in the 111th United States Congress, Neal voted with the Democratic party leadership 95% of the time.[30]

Neal served as a member of the House Democratic Steering Committee in the 105th Congress and was an at-large whip for the House Democrats.[9][15] He is a co-chair of the New England Congressional Caucus, a group aiming to advance the regional interests of New England.[9]

Economy and budget

With several committee posts, Neal has made economic policy the focus of his career, although his success has been mixed.[6] He served his first two terms on the House Banking Committee, where he served on the Financial Services Subcommittee. As the banking reform law of 1991 was being drafted, he cautioned that President George H. W. Bush‘s proposal could negatively affect small businesses and minority-owned businesses. He introduced an amendment to require reports on lending to these businesses, which was adopted.[31]

In 1993 Neal moved to the House Ways and Means Committee, where he currently serves.[31] He has been chairman of the Subcommittee on Select Revenue Measures since 2008 and is a member of the Subcommittee on Trade. Previously he served on the Oversight and Social Security subcommittees.[32] In the late 2000s analysts considered Neal a likely frontrunner for chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, and in the wake of Charles B. Rangel‘s 2010 departure he began actively seeking the post.[7][33] In June 2010, while pursuing the chairmanship, he invited campaign contributors to a $5,000-per-person weekend fundraiser in Cape Cod. This drew fire from The Boston Globe, which criticized him for “[acceding] to the capital’s money culture.”[34]

According to Congressional Quarterly‘s Politics in America, one of Neal’s longstanding legislative priorities is to simplify the tax code.[6] Neal has long advocated repealing the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT), believing its effects have reached unreasonably low income brackets.[35] He led an unsuccessful movement to reform the AMT in 2007.[6] In 1998 he successfully pushed to exempt a child tax credit from being affected by the AMT, and in 2001 Congress made the exemption permanent at his urging.[36] He voted against the tax cuts of 2001 and 2003, saying they would force millions onto the AMT.[37] Another priority of Neal’s is to eliminate tax “loopholes” that favor higher-income individuals.[6] He was the lead proponent of a bill to require federal contractors to pay federal taxes for workers hired through offshore shell headquarters. The bill, H.R. 6081, passed both houses of Congress unanimously and was signed into law in May 2008.[38]

On trade policy, Neal has a moderate record, supporting lower trade barriers.[39] He voted against the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1993.[15] In 1995 and 2002 he voted against fast track bills that gave the president the authority to negotiate trade deals without amendments by Congress. In 2007 he voted in favor of the United States – Peru Trade Promotion Agreement despite some Democratic opposition.[6]

Neal is a strong supporter of the Social Security program. He moved from the Trade subcommittee to the Social Security subcommittee in 2005 to challenge President George W. Bush‘s attempts to partially privatize it.[37] He pushed a proposal to automatically enroll employees in Individual Retirement Accounts (IRAs), and successfully lobbied President Barack Obama to include it in a proposed 2009 budget outline.[6]

In February 2019, Neal came under criticism for failing to promptly exercise his authority as Ways and Means Committee chair to subpoena Donald Trump’s tax returns.[40] Citing a need to build a strong case in a potential lawsuit, Neal delayed taking this step until May 2019.[41]

In 2019 the House Ways and Means Committee led by Neal passed a bill that would prohibit the IRS from creating a free electronic tax filing system.[42] During his 2016 and 2018 campaigns, Neal received $16,000 in contributions from Intuit and H&R Block, two tax preparation companies that have lobbied against the creation of free tax filing systems.[42]

For his tenure as the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee in the 116th Congress, Neal earned an “F” grade from the non-partisan Lugar Center‘s Congressional Oversight Hearing Index.[43]

Foreign policy

Descended from Irish nationalist grandparents on both sides, Neal has been an advocate for Irish concerns throughout his Congressional career, pushing to keep the United States involved in the Northern Ireland peace process. He is the co-chair of the ad hoc Committee on Irish Affairs, has been chairman of the Friends of Ireland since 2007, and was considered as a candidate for United States Ambassador to Ireland in 1998.[6][44] After the disarmament of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) in September 2005, Neal was among a group of Congressmen who met with Sinn Féin MP Martin McGuinness to congratulate him on the disarmament and ensure a lasting peace had been reached.[45][46] Neal invited Sinn Féin President Gerry Adams to the inauguration of Barack Obama in January 2009.[47] Neal has been named as one of the top 100 Irish-Americans by Irish America magazine and received the International Leadership Award from The American Ireland Fund in 2002.[44][48]

Neal is an opponent of the Iraq War, saying it was based on false intelligence. He voted against the original invasion in 2003 and opposed President Bush’s 2006 request to send additional troops.[37] He cited veterans’ affairs as his top priority in 2010.[49]

In 2017, Neal backed the Israeli Anti-Boycott Act, aimed to punish companies that boycott Israel.[50]

Health care

A longtime advocate of health care reform, Neal was involved in the major health care reform efforts of 1993–94 and 2009–10. In working on the unsuccessful Clinton health care plan of 1993 he served the interests of the major health insurance and medical companies in his district, achieving a compromise allowing insurance companies to charge small businesses higher premiums.[31] He was later involved writing the House’s 2009 health care reform bill, the Affordable Health Care for America Act. As chairman of the Select Revenue Measures subcommittee, he had a hand in developing the bill’s financing plan. He explained that his priorities were to address “pre-existing conditions, capping out-of-pocket expenses and making sure people don’t lose their health care if they lose their job”.[49][51] Despite his support for the act, he spoke about his preference for a “piecemeal” approach to health care reform, saying it would allow for a more reasonable debate.[52]

As chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, before a March 2019 hearing on Medicare for All, Neal told Democrats on the panel that he didn’t want the phrase “Medicare for All” to be used. He argued that Medicare for All was wrong on policy and a political loser.[53] In December 2019, some blamed Neal for killing legislation that would have ended surprise medical bills,[54] suspecting it may have been because of industry lobbyist donations to his reelection campaign.[55][56] As of the 2019–20 election cycle, Neal is third-highest among House members in campaign contributions from the health services/HMO industry.[57] The insurance and pharmaceutical industries are among the top contributors to his campaign committee.[57]

Retirement planning

Neal introduced the bipartisan SECURE Act of 2019, which contained a number of provisions to expand access to retirement planning options and encourage employers to set up retirement plans for workers. The bill, originally introduced in late March 2019, became law in December 2019 as part of the fiscal year 2020 federal appropriations bill.[58]

Abortion

Representing a relatively Catholic district, Neal has a more conservative record on abortion than other representatives from Massachusetts.[6] He said in 2010, “I have always opposed taxpayer funding of abortion. I’d keep Roe v. Wade and restrict it. I’ve always thought: keep abortion, with restrictions for late-term abortion. [Given] the voting pattern I have, both sides would say I’m mixed, and guess what? That’s where the American people are.”[52] He voted for the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003, which made the intact dilation and extraction abortion procedure illegal in most cases.[6] During debate on the House health care reform bill, he voted in favor of the Stupak–Pitts Amendment to restrict government funding of abortion.[59] In 2021 Neal was listed as an original co-sponsor of the Women’s Health Protection Act.[60]

Other social issues

On other social issues Neal has a moderate record: he supports a proposed Constitutional amendment to ban desecration of the U.S. flag, and has twice voted against an amendment to ban same-sex marriage.[6]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Personal life

Neal is a Roman Catholic.[15] He lives in Springfield with his wife Maureen Neal, née Conway. They have four children: Rory Christopher, Brendan Conway, Maura Katherine, and Sean Richard.[10] In addition to his duties as a congressman, Neal teaches a journalism course at the University of Massachusetts Amherst called “The Politician and the Journalist”.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ “Springfield’s Richard Neal Will Be the Next Dean of Massachusetts’ Congressional Delegation”. Congressman Richard Neal. June 28, 2013. Archived from the original on May 8, 2021. Retrieved March 2, 2021.
  2. ^ “Meet Richie”. Congressman Richard Neal. December 3, 2012. Archived from the original on March 18, 2021. Retrieved March 9, 2021.
  3. ^ Neal, Richard. “Opinion | Why my committee needs the president’s tax returns”. Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on February 2, 2021. Retrieved March 9, 2021.
  4. ^ Irish Central, “2020 Irish America Hall of Fame inductees announced” January 26, 2020 [1] Archived January 27, 2020, at the Wayback Machine
  5. ^ “neal”. freepages.rootsweb.com. Archived from the original on March 28, 2020. Retrieved November 24, 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k McCutcheon, Chuck, and Lyons, Christina L. (eds.) (2009). “Neal, Richard E., D-Mass.” CQ’s Politics in America 2010: The 111th Congress. Washington: Congressional Quarterly. pp. 488–489.ISBN 978-1-60426-602-3.
  7. ^ a b c d Viser, Matt (June 4, 2010). “Neal seeks top job on Ways and Means committee.” The Boston Globe: p. A1.
  8. ^ a b “A profile of a congressman: Populist roots and political instincts of U.S. Rep. Richard Neal.” Daily Hampshire Gazette: p. A1. November 2, 1999.
  9. ^ a b c d Neal, Richard E. “Biography Archived April 23, 2018, at the Wayback Machine.” Congressman Richard Neal (official website). United States House of Representatives. Retrieved June 27, 2010.
  10. ^ a b Alston, Farnsworth; Carter, Mary Ann; Randolph, Sarah (eds.) (2009). “Neal, Richard E.” Congressional Directory for the 111th Congress (2009–2010). Washington: Government Printing Office. p. 127.ISBN 978-0-16-083727-2.
  11. ^ a b Duncan, Phil, et al. (December 31, 1988). “House freshmen: Massachusetts—2nd district.” CQ Weekly: p. 3610. CQ Press.
  12. ^ Farrell, David (March 5, 1980). “Massachusetts delegates chosen in the primary.” The Boston Globe.
  13. ^ a b “Grads to hear Neal talk.” The Union-News: p. 14. May 17, 1989.
  14. ^ Hall, Michelle (December 27, 1988). “The new Democrats in the House.” The Washington Post: p. A13.
  15. ^ a b c d e f Duncan, Philip D., and Nutting, Brian (eds.) (1999). “Neal, Richard E., D-Mass.” CQ’s Politics in America 2000: The 106th Congress. Washington: Congressional Quarterly. pp. 488–489.ISBN 978-1-56802-470-7.
  16. ^ Dendy, Dallas L., Jr. (1989). “Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 8, 1988 Archived July 20, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.” United States Government Printing Office. p. 20. Retrieved March 2, 2010.
  17. ^ Dendy, Dallas L., Jr. (1991). “Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 6, 1990 Archived July 21, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.” United States Government Printing Office. p. 17. Retrieved March 2, 2010.
  18. ^ Dendy, Dallas L., Jr. (1993). “Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 3, 1992 Archived January 23, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.” United States Government Printing Office. p. 32. Retrieved March 2, 2010.
  19. ^ Carle, Robin H. (1995). “Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 8, 1994 Archived May 25, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.United States Government Printing Office. p. 16.
  20. ^ Carle, Robin H. (1995). “Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 8, 1994 Archived May 25, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.” United States Government Printing Office. p. 16. Retrieved March 2, 2010.
  21. ^ Carle, Robin H. (1997). “Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 5, 1996 Archived May 25, 2017, at the Wayback Machine.” United States Government Printing Office. p. 29. Retrieved March 2, 2010.
  22. ^ Smock, Frederick A. (May 30, 2000). “Neal may face primary challenge: Springfield man submits nomination papers to run in 2nd district.” Telegram & Gazette: p. B3.
  23. ^ Associated Press (September 14, 2010). “Tom Wesley wins GOP nod in Mass. 2nd District Archived June 13, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.” The Boston Herald. Retrieved September 14, 2010.
  24. ^ a b Young, Shannon. Massachusetts 1st Congressional District race: Richard Neal defeats Democratic challenger Tahirah Amatul-Wadud Archived July 24, 2019, at the Wayback Machine, MassLive LLC, September 5, 2018. Accessed July 22, 2019.
  25. ^ Dwyer, Dialynn (September 2, 2020). Sometimes the first time around, you don’t win,’ Holyoke Mayor Alex Morse says following failed run for Congress”. Boston Globe. Archived from the original on September 3, 2020. Retrieved September 3, 2020.
  26. ^ A 501tax-exempt, OpenSecrets; NW, charitable organization 1300 L. St; Washington, Suite 200; info, DC 20005 telelphone857-0044. “Top Recipients of PAC Money”. OpenSecrets. Archived from the original on July 7, 2021. Retrieved July 6, 2021.
  27. ^ 2008 Congressional Voting Record Archived August 24, 2013, at WebCite.” ADA Today 64: 1. Americans for Democratic Action. p. 2. Retrieved March 2, 2010.
  28. ^ 2009 U.S. House Votes Archived July 5, 2011, at the Wayback Machine.” American Conservative Union. 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2010.
  29. ^ House voting with party scores: 110th Congress Archived 2007-12-29 at the Wayback Machine.” The Washington Post. Retrieved March 2, 2010.
  30. ^ “Richard Neal (D)”. The U.S. Congress Votes Database. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on July 20, 2012. Retrieved July 20, 2012.
  31. ^ a b c Duncan, Philip D., and Lawrence, Christine C. (eds.) (1995). “Neal, Richard E., D-Mass.” CQ’s Politics in America 1996: The 104th Congress. Washington: Congressional Quarterly. pp. 620–622.ISBN 978-0-87187-843-4.
  32. ^ Former and Current Members (Select Revenue Measures) Archived 2010-07-07 at the Wayback Machine,” “Current Members (Trade) Archived 2010-06-27 at the Wayback Machine,” “Former and Current Members (Oversight) Archived 2010-07-07 at the Wayback Machine,” and “Former and Current Members (Social Security) Archived 2010-07-07 at the Wayback Machine.” Committee on Ways and Means (official website). Retrieved June 27, 2010.
  33. ^ Barry, Stephanie (December 29, 2008). “Rep. Neal in running for major House post.” The Republican: p. A1.
  34. ^ Neal should pursue top post, but not by charging for access Archived June 16, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.” The Boston Globe. June 9, 2010. Retrieved September 4, 2010.
  35. ^ Nitschke, Lori (February 3, 2001). “Bush’s Tax Cut Plan Would Leave Many Snagged by Alternative Minimum Levy.” CQ Weekly. Congressional Quarterly. p. 274.
  36. ^ Johnston, David Cay (2003). . Portfolio (Penguin Group). p. 111.ISBN 1-59184-019-8.
  37. ^ a b c Koszczuk, Jackie, and Angle, Martha (eds.) (2007). “Neal, Richard E., D-Mass.” CQ’s Politics in America 2008: The 110th Congress. Washington: Congressional Quarterly. pp. 485–486.ISBN 978-0-87289-545-4.
  38. ^ Stockman, Farah (May 23, 2008). “Senate OK’s bill barring contractors from avoiding tax – Some had hired via offshore firms.” The Boston Globe: p. A2.
  39. ^ “Richard Neal on Free Trade”. On The Issues. OnTheIssues. Archived from the original on November 25, 2010. Retrieved July 9, 2012.
  40. ^ Young, Shannon (February 13, 2019). “Tom Steyer urges US Rep. Richard Neal to immediately request president’s tax returns”. Mass Live. Archived from the original on February 13, 2019.
  41. ^ Fandos, Nicholas (May 10, 2019). “House Ways and Means Chairman Subpoenas Trump Tax Returns”. The New York Times. Archived from the original on May 11, 2019.
  42. ^ a b Elliott, Justin (April 9, 2019). “Congress Is About to Ban the Government From Offering Free Online Tax Filing. Thank TurboTax”. ProPublica. Archived from the original on April 9, 2019. Retrieved April 9, 2019.
  43. ^ “Congressional Oversight Hearing Index”. Welcome to the Congressional Oversight Hearing Index. The Lugar Center. Archived from the original on February 8, 2021. Retrieved February 8, 2021.
  44. ^ a b Duncan, Philip D., and Nutting, Brian (eds.) (2004). “Neal, Richard E., D-Mass.” CQ’s Politics in America 2004: The 108th Congress. Washington: Congressional Quarterly. pp. 483–484.ISBN 978-1-56802-813-2.
  45. ^ Staunton, Denis (September 29, 2005). “McGuinness reassures Washington.” The Irish Times: p. 7.
  46. ^ Murphy, Ryan G. (September 29, 2005). “Rep. Neal praises IRA disarmament.” Telegram & Gazette: p. A8.
  47. ^ “Barack Obama inauguration: Gerry Adams to attend ceremony”. The Telegraph. January 19, 2009. Archived from the original on December 17, 2009. Retrieved June 9, 2009.
  48. ^ Black, Chris (March 14, 1998). “Some ammunition for looming rematch.” The Boston Globe: p. A3.
  49. ^ a b Boynton, Donna (January 15, 2010). “Students grill Rep. Neal on big issues.” Telegram & Gazette: p. B5.
  50. ^ Christensen, Dusty. “Neal backs bill to punish supporters of boycotting Israel”. Daily Hampshire Gazette. Archived from the original on April 15, 2021. Retrieved April 15, 2021.
  51. ^ Montgomery, Lori, and Murray, Shailagh (June 19, 2009). “Senate’s Health-Care Draft Calls for Most to Buy Insurance, Nixes Obama’s ‘Public Option’.” The Washington Post.
  52. ^ a b Palpini, Kristin (February 12, 2010). “Neal urges piecemeal votes on health care reform.” Telegram & Gazette.
  53. ^ Grim, Ryan; Lacy, Akela (June 11, 2019). “Ways and Means Committee Chair Doesn’t Want Medicare for All Hearing to Mention “Medicare for All. The Intercept. Archived from the original on June 11, 2020. Retrieved April 9, 2020.
  54. ^ McLeod, Paul (December 19, 2019). “A Deal To End Surprise Medical Billing Was Tanked At The Last Minute”. BuzzFeed News. Archived from the original on April 28, 2020. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  55. ^ Shaw, Donald (May 5, 2020). “Neal Took Big Bucks From Lobbyists While Killing a Surprise Medical Bills Fix”. Sludge. Archived from the original on May 15, 2020. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  56. ^ Bluth, Rachel (December 17, 2020). “Congress Considers Bipartisan Compromise Legislation On Surprise Medical Bills”. NPR.org. Archived from the original on May 20, 2020. Retrieved May 15, 2020.
  57. ^ a b NW, The Center for Responsive Politics 1300 L. St; Washington, Suite 200; info, DC 20005 telelphone857-0044. “Rep. Richard E Neal – Massachusetts District 01”. OpenSecrets. Archived from the original on March 10, 2021. Retrieved April 9, 2020.
  58. ^ O’Brien, Elizabeth (December 19, 2019). “Congress Just Passed the Biggest Retirement Bill in More Than a Decade. Here’s What You Need to Know”. Money.com. Archived from the original on December 30, 2019. Retrieved December 29, 2019.
  59. ^ Bedard, Paul (November 10, 2009). “Republicans Hail the 64 ‘Pro-Life’ Democrats Archived October 25, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.” U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved June 25, 2010.
  60. ^ “Cosponsors – H.R.3755 – 117th Congress (2021-2022): Women’s Health Protection Act of 2021”. September 29, 2021. Archived from the original on October 6, 2021. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  61. ^ “Meet Richie”. Congressman Richard Neal. December 3, 2012. Archived from the original on March 18, 2021. Retrieved March 9, 2021.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts’s 2nd congressional district

1989–2013
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts’s 1st congressional district

2013–present
Incumbent
Preceded by

Chair of the House Ways and Means Committee
2019–present
Preceded by

Chair of the Joint Taxation Committee
2019–2020
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Chair of the Joint Taxation Committee
2021–present
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
10th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

  • Committee on Ways and Means (Chair)
    • As the chair of the committee as a whole, he serves as an ex officio member on all the subcommittees
  • Joint Committee on Taxation (Chair)

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

X
Jim McGovernJim McGovern – MA2

Current Position: US Representative for MA House District 2 since 1997
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): US House Staff from 1981 – 1996

Other Positions:  
Chair, House Committee on Rules
Chair, Congressional-Executive Commission on China
Co-Chair of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission

Featured Quote: 
Hunger in America isn’t a new problem. But it is a solvable one. In 1969 the first and only @WhiteHouse
Conference on Food, Nutrition and Health led to landmark legislation and less hunger. It’s time for new voices, new ideas and a new White House conference to #EndHungerNow.

Featured Video: 
Rep. Jim McGovern opening statement on impeachment debate

Today, Rules Committee Chairman James P. McGovern (D-MA) sent a letter signed by all 25 Committee Chairs in the United States House of Representatives and addressed to President Joseph R. Biden Jr. urging him to convene a national conference on food, nutrition, hunger, and health.

Calling for further action to address a hunger crisis exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, the committee leaders said that nearly 40 million Americans lacked the resources to keep food on the table even before the pandemic, and said that a national conference convened by the White House is essential to preventing hunger and improving America’s food system.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MA House District 2 since 1997
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): US House Staff from 1981 – 1996

Other Positions:  
Chair, House Committee on Rules
Chair, Congressional-Executive Commission on China
Co-Chair of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission

Featured Quote: 
Hunger in America isn’t a new problem. But it is a solvable one. In 1969 the first and only @WhiteHouse
Conference on Food, Nutrition and Health led to landmark legislation and less hunger. It’s time for new voices, new ideas and a new White House conference to #EndHungerNow.

Featured Video: 
Rep. Jim McGovern opening statement on impeachment debate

News

Today, Rules Committee Chairman James P. McGovern (D-MA) sent a letter signed by all 25 Committee Chairs in the United States House of Representatives and addressed to President Joseph R. Biden Jr. urging him to convene a national conference on food, nutrition, hunger, and health.

Calling for further action to address a hunger crisis exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, the committee leaders said that nearly 40 million Americans lacked the resources to keep food on the table even before the pandemic, and said that a national conference convened by the White House is essential to preventing hunger and improving America’s food system.

Twitter

About

Jim McGovern 2

Source: Government page

Jim was born and raised in the Burncoat neighborhood of Worcester. The values he learned from his friends and family are the same ones he fights for every day in Congress: fairness, decency, respect for all people, and the idea that each of us has an obligation to give back to our community. Jim’s parents, Walter and Mindy, own a small package store in Worcester, and his sisters are both public school teachers. He is married to Lisa Murray McGovern and they have two children, Patrick and Molly.

First elected to Congress in 1996, Jim has fought tirelessly for the people of Massachusetts and has earned the respect and trust of his colleagues – including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who named him Chairman of the powerful House Rules Committee during the 116th Congress.

He is a senior member of the House Committee on Agriculture’s Subcommittee on Nutrition and Oversight. He also serves as the Chairman of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, and is the Democratic Co-Chair of the bipartisan Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission – both of which monitor, investigate and advocate on behalf of international human rights, the rule of law, and good governance.

Jim’s commitment to public service began at a young age. In 7th grade, Jim volunteered on the 1972 presidential campaign of Senator George McGovern – no relation. When Jim decided to attend college at the American University in Washington, D.C. he applied for an internship in the office of Senator McGovern. He worked his way through college as an intern, earning a BA in history in 1981 before going to work in the office of Congressman Joe Moakley, a Democrat from South Boston. While working for Moakley, Jim went back to American University to earn a Master’s Degree in Public Administration in 1984.

It was also in Moakley’s office that Jim was asked to help lead the investigation of the murders of six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper and her daughter in El Salvador following public outrage in Congress. He exposed that the murders were committed by the U.S. – backed Salvadoran military, leading to a major shift in U.S. foreign policy that made future military aid contingent on improved human rights and a negotiated peace in El Salvador.

Jim saw firsthand what strong, principled leadership looked like while working for Congressman Moakley. But with Newt Gingrich as Speaker, he also saw that too often, Washington worked for the rich and powerful instead of the American people. Jim successfully ran for Congress in 1996 and has won reelection in each subsequent term. After his first election, when Jim was on the House Floor to take the oath of office, he took his two mentors – Moakley and Senator McGovern – with him. He asked them both: “what should I know before I take this oath?”

Senator McGovern said: “get over the fear of losing an election, or else you’ll constantly be obsessed with polls instead of doing what’s right. Always do what’s right.

Congressman Moakley said: “get to know everyone here as a person. Get to know what they stand for and who they are and treat them with respect.”

Jim has never forgotten their advice. From principled stands on tough issues to working with Members of Congress from across the country and on both sides of the aisle, Jim has fought to ensure that every single person in this country and around the world is treated with dignity and respect.

Some of Jim’s Biggest Accomplishments Include:

  • Successfully increasing Pell Grant funding for low-income students struggling to afford college.
  • Authoring, introducing, and having the president sign into law vital legislation to create a Federal Advisory Council on Grandparents Raising Grandchildren in light of the opioid epidemic.
  • Creating the Innovative Approaches to Literacy Program which provides competitive awards to school libraries and not-for-profit organizations for the purposes of providing books and childhood literacy activities to children and families in high-need communities.
  • Securing millions of dollars through the appropriations process for the creation of a Wounded Warrior Service Dog Pilot Program to help wounded veterans live with independence and dignity.
  • Protecting and expanding the Land and Water Conservation Fund program, especially the stateside program that provides funding for local recreational facilities, urban parks and trails.
  • Creating the McGovern-Dole Food for Education program, which provides nutritious meals in a school setting to nearly 9 million of the world’s poorest children.

Jim Has Fought Tirelessly For The People Of Massachusetts Second’ District By:

  • Successfully ensuring that federal aid is available for family farms following unusual droughts in Massachusetts by ensuring that economic injury disaster loans are available to farmers in addition to standard disaster assistance.
  • Working directly with the FAA and the City of Worcester to secure funding for a new, state-of-the art Category III instrument landing system at Worcester Regional Airport that allows airplanes from destinations across the country to land and take off in all weather conditions.
  • Bringing millions of dollars’ worth of federal funding to Worcester that have played a key role in the ongoing redevelopment and revitalization projects downtown like City Square, the Gardner, Kilby Hammond Neighborhood Revitalization Project and the Castle Park project in Main South.
  • Championing the creation of the Blackstone River Valley National Historical Park to highlight the birthplace of the American Industrial Revolution, and securing federal funding for the new state-of-the-art Visitors Center and bike path that runs along the river.

Jim Has Also Worked Tirelessly to Ensure That America Stands up for Global Human Rights:

  • Jim wrote, introduced, and saw signed into law the Sergei Magnitsky Rule of Law Accountability Act, which allows the President to punish foreign officials who the U.S. identifies as corrupt or human rights abusers. The law was so successful, Congress later applied it world-wide as the Global Magnitsky Act.
  • He wrote, introduced, and saw signed into law the Reciprocal Access to Tibet Act, which denies Chinese government officials access to the United States if they are responsible for creating or implementing restrictions on American government officials, journalists, independent observers and tourists seeking access to Tibet.
  • He has also introduced and championed resolutions to end violence against children globally; prohibit arms sales and security assistance to Saudi Arabia; reduce and eliminate nuclear weapons; and end restrictions on American’s right to travel to Cuba.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills 

Caucuses

Caucus Co-chair
Congressional Caucus for Competitiveness in Entertainment Technology (E-Tech)
Congressional Cystic Fibrosis Caucus
Congressional Home Health Caucus
Congressional Mitochondrial Disease Caucus
Congressional Study Group on Public Health
Friends of Switzerland Caucus
House Hunger Caucus
International Workers Rights Caucus
No War with Iran Caucus

Caucus Member
Americans Abroad Caucus
Armenian Issues Caucus
Bicameral Congressional Caucus on Parkinson’s Disease
Bipartisan Congressional Task Force on Alzheimer’s Disease
Bipartisan Taskforce for Combating Anti-Semitism
Caucus on Religious Minorities in the Middle East
Childhood Cancer Caucus
Coalition for Autism Research and Education
Congenital Heart Caucus
Congressional Academic Medicine Caucus
Congressional Addiction, Treatment, and Recovery Caucus
Congressional Albanian Issues Caucus
Congressional Arts Caucus
Congressional Bicameral High-Speed and Intercity Passenger Rail Caucus
Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus
Congressional Brain Injury Task Force
Congressional Caucus on Community Health Centers
Congressional Caucus on Foster Youth
Congressional Caucus on Green Jobs
Congressional Caucus on Youth Sports
Congressional Children’s Caucus
Congressional Children’s Caucus, Task Force on Childhood Obesity
Congressional Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Caucus
Congressional Coalition on Adoption
Congressional Coastal Caucus
Congressional Community Pharmacy Caucus
Congressional Caucus on Parkinson’s Disease
Congressional Caucus on the Kingdom of the Netherlands
Congressional Cranberry Caucus
Congressional Cut Flower Caucus
Congressional Dairy Farmers Caucus
Congressional Deaf Caucus
Congressional Diabetes Caucus
Congressional Down Syndrome Caucus
Congressional Dyslexia Caucus
Congressional Fire Services Caucus
Congressional Full Employment Caucus
Congressional Global Health Caucus
Congressional Heart and Stroke Coalition
Congressional High Tech Caucus
Congressional Higher Education Caucus
Congressional Historic Preservation Caucus
Congressional House Ocean Caucus
Congressional Human Trafficking Caucus
Congressional Humanities Caucus
Congressional JOBS NOW! Caucus
Congressional Labor and Working Families Caucus
Congressional Library of Congress Caucus
Congressional Medical Technology Caucus
Congressional Men’s Health Caucus
Congressional Military Family Caucus
Congressional Monitoring Group on Labor Rights in Colombia (appointed by Speaker Pelosi)
Congressional Multiple Sclerosis Caucus
Congressional National Parks Caucus
Congressional Oral Health Caucus
Congressional Peace Corps Caucus
Congressional Pollinator Caucus
Congressional Portuguese American Caucus
Congressional Progressive Caucus
Congressional Public Transportation Caucus
Congressional Refugee Caucus
Congressional Rock and Roll Caucus
Congressional Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) Education Caucus
Congressional Shellfish Caucus
Congressional Shipbuilding Caucus
Congressional Small Business Caucus
Congressional Soccer Caucus
Congressional STEAM Caucus
Congressional Steel Caucus
Congressional Submarine Caucus
Congressional Travel and Tourism Caucus
Congressional Wounded to Work Caucus
Crohn’s and Colitis Caucus
Cuba Working Group
Down Syndrome Caucus
Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Caucus
French Caucus
Friends of Ireland
Friends of Job Corps Congressional Caucus
Generic Drug Equity Caucus
House Caucus on Hellenic Issues
House Diplomacy Caucus
House General Aviation Caucus
House National Service Caucus
House Organic Caucus
House Science and National Labs Caucus
International Basic Education Caucus
Irish Issues Caucus
Lyme Disease Caucus
Military Sexual Assault Prevention Caucus
National Guard and Reserve Components Caucus
NextGen 9-1-1 Caucus
Northeast Midwest Congressional Coalition
Peak Oil Caucus
Pollinator Protection Caucus
Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Caucus
Safe Climate Caucus
Sustainable Energy and Environment Coalition (SEEC)
TRIO Caucus
Veterinary Medicine Caucus

Offices

Washington, DC Office

370 Cannon House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515

phone: 202-225-6101
fax: 202-225-5759

Leominster Office

24 Church Street, Room 27
Leominster, MA 01453

phone: 978-466-3552
fax: 978-466-3973

Northampton Office

94 Pleasant Street
Northampton, MA 01060

phone: 413-341-8700
fax: 413-584-1216

Worcester Office

12 East Worcester Street, Suite 1
Worcester, MA 01604

phone: 508-831-7356
fax: 508-754-0982

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook, Wikipedia

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

VoteSmart – National Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

James Patrick McGovern (born November 20, 1959) is a member of the United States House of Representatives, representing Massachusetts’s 2nd congressional district since 1997. He is the chair of the House Rules Committee and of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China as well as the co-chair of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission. He is a member of the Democratic Party. The district, numbered as the 3rd district from 1997 to 2013, stretches from Worcester to the Pioneer Valley.

Born and raised in Worcester, McGovern attended Worcester Academy. While in college he worked as a congressional intern and then aide to U.S. Senator George McGovern (to whom he was not related), a two-time presidential candidate for whom he campaigned.[1] From 1981 to 1996 he was a senior staff member for U.S. Representative Joe Moakley. McGovern first ran for Congress in 1994, where he lost in the Democratic primary. He ran again in 1996, defeating Republican incumbent Peter Blute. He has been reelected every two years since then without serious difficulty.

As chairman of the board of the Congressional Hunger Center, McGovern is known as a leading voice on ending hunger and food insecurity both in the United States and globally.[2] He was a key architect of the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program.[3] For his work he has earned a 2016 James Beard Leadership Award from the James Beard Foundation, as well as a 2008 McGovern-Dole Leadership Award from the World Food Program USA.[4][5]

Another key focus of his career has been international human rights, which he has advocated for in countries such as El Salvador, Sudan, Colombia, and the Chinese region Tibet. He is a member of the Congressional Progressive Caucus[6] and has been ranked as one of the most liberal members of Congress.[7]

Early life, education, and career

James Patrick McGovern[8] was born in Worcester, Massachusetts on November 20, 1959. He grew up in Worcester, where his mother Mindy was a dance instructor and his father Walter owned a liquor store.[9][10] In junior high school, he first became involved in politics by campaigning for Democratic U.S. Senator George McGovern (to whom he is not related) in his unsuccessful 1972 presidential bid. After graduating from Worcester Academy he moved to Washington, D.C., where from 1977 to 1980, he worked as an aide to George McGovern.

James P. McGovern (Left) and Senator George McGovern (Right)

He attended American University, where he received a Bachelor of Arts in history in 1981 and a Master of Public Administration in 1984. He also served as the Director of the Kennedy Political Union, American University’s student-run speakers bureau. George McGovern ran for president again in 1984, Jim McGovern was the state coordinator of his Massachusetts campaign branch, and he made his nominating speech at the 1984 Democratic National Convention.[10]

In 1981 McGovern joined the Capitol Hill staff of Joe Moakley, a Democratic U.S. Representative from Massachusetts.[10] He was appointed by Moakley in 1990 to lead a House task force investigating the 1989 murder of six Jesuit priests and two women in El Salvador by the Salvadoran Army, working with Salvadoran activist Leonel Gómez Vides.[11] He later advocated cutting off U.S. funding for the U.S. Army School of the Americas, where several of the military members had been trained.[10]

U.S. House of Representatives

Elections

McGovern first ran for Congress in 1994, running in a crowded Democratic primary to represent the area then defined as Massachusetts’s 3rd district.[10] The district, located in central and southeastern Massachusetts, included parts of Bristol, Middlesex, Norfolk, and Worcester counties–essentially, the heart of the MetroWest region.[12] During the campaign McGovern asserted that his record as “a Washington insider” would make him a more effective representative. Despite endorsements from George McGovern, Joe Moakley, and presidential aide George Stephanopoulos, McGovern lost in the primary to Massachusetts State Representative Kevin O’Sullivan,[10][13] who then lost to freshman Republican incumbent Peter Blute.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (far left) swearing in McGovern to a 12th term in Congress in January of 2019.

McGovern left Moakley’s office in 1996 and moved back to Worcester, again running for Congress. This time, he took the nomination unopposed and faced Blute in the general election. His campaign slogan focused on unseating House Speaker Newt Gingrich: “To dump Newt you have to dump Blute.”[14] Blute was endorsed by The Boston Globe and five other local papers, but McGovern won the election with 53 percent of the vote.[9][15] He has never faced another contest nearly that close, and has been re-elected ten times. He ran unopposed in 2000 and 2002.[15]

In 2004, he was opposed by Republican , an evangelical pastor, former Georgia state legislator, and president of the . Crews, a national conservative activist, challenged McGovern’s positions on same-sex marriage and abortion. McGovern derided his opponent’s focus on social issues, saying, “When Ron Crews gets up in the morning, the first thing he thinks about is gay marriage. I don’t think that is the most important issue for most families. Jobs, health care, education, how to make the world a more peaceful place, those are the issues people care about.”[16] McGovern defeated Crews with 71 percent of the vote, and ran unopposed in 2006 and 2008.[15]

In the 2010 election, he faced Republican , a real estate lawyer, and independent Patrick J. Barron, a Department of Mental Health administrator.[17][18] He was re-elected with 57 percent of the vote.[19]

When Massachusetts lost a district in the 2010 census, McGovern’s district was renumbered as the 2nd district and pushed west to Amherst and the Pioneer Valley. He ran unopposed in 2012, 2014, and 2016.

McGovern chairs a meeting of the Rules Committee during the 116th Congress in 2019.

Tenure

McGovern took over the top Democratic position on the House Rules Committee when Rep. Louise Slaughter died.[20] Following the 2018 midterm elections in which Democrats regained the majority in the House, McGovern became Chairman.

Called the “Speaker’s Committee” because it is the mechanism that the Speaker of the House uses to maintain order and control of the House Floor, the Rules Committee is frequently considered the most powerful committee in either the House or the Senate.[21] As Chairman, McGovern has the ability to influence the introduction and consideration of almost every piece of legislation that comes to the floor for a vote.[22]

One of McGovern’s first actions as Chairman was to pass a sweeping set of reforms to the House Rules. He wrote at the time that his changes were designed to “usher in a new era of clean government.”[23] McGovern also said the rules changes were “the result of unprecedented bipartisan outreach” and that he met with “both Democrats and Republicans to seek their input on potential changes.”[24]

The National Journal reported that McGovern has been able to use his Capitol Hill experience to help position himself as “a power broker in the Democratic caucus.” In 2001, McGovern’s mentor, Joe Moakley, at the time dying of cancer, asked Dick Gephardt to help McGovern attain a seat on the Rules Committee. He didn’t receive that next seat, but was given a commitment for the next available Democratic seat.

While on the Rules Committee, McGovern has been able to use his experience with House procedures to his advantage. With Republicans comprising the majority of the panel, he “showed a sharp partisan edge as he embraced parliamentary maneuvers that led to cries of outrage” from House GOP members.[citation needed]

Impeachment of Donald Trump

As Chairman, McGovern played a central role in devising procedures adopted by the House for the Impeachment of Donald Trump.[25] At the time, McGovern wrote in the Boston Globe that “[t]he House will ensure the public-facing phase of this inquiry is transparent and will stand the test of time.”[26] McGovern later explained his decision to vote yes on impeachment by saying “I often think about kids today getting involved in the political process just like I did back in 1972. What will they think if we say that the president’s actions don’t matter?”[27] He supported impeaching President Trump again for inciting the riot that stormed the capitol.[28]

Domestic policy

Transportation

For his first three terms, McGovern served on the House Transportation Committee. He and fellow Massachusetts representative John Olver, who served on the House Appropriations Committee, would coordinate to bring extensive transportation funding to their respective districts. When criticized for his heavy use of earmarks, McGovern was quoted in response saying, “It’s not pork. It’s nourishment.”[29]

Fiscal policy

McGovern supported economic stimulus efforts during the late-2000s recession, including the Economic Stimulus Act in February 2008[30] and the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act (which established the Troubled Asset Relief Program) in October 2008.[31] He supported the Obama administration‘s 2009 stimulus package.[32] Responding to Republican criticism of Democratic budgetary priorities, he chided the GOP for running up the national debt under George W. Bush, saying: “It is somewhat ironic that the very people who drove this economy into a ditch are now complaining about the size of the tow truck.”[33] He voted to instate the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act in February 2010.[34]

Education

The included an amendment by McGovern that doubled Pell Grant funding for two years for students who graduate in the top 10 percent of their class.[35]

Nutrition

McGovern in 2013, addressing the Food Policy session of the United States Conference of Mayors in Washington D.C.

As co-chair of the , McGovern is an advocate for expanding child nutrition programs both domestically and internationally.[36] In 2007 McGovern obtained $840 million in required funding for the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program in the House version of the farm bill.[37] The House–Senate conference committee stripped most of the funding from the final bill.[38]

As the co-chairman of the , McGovern has pushed for changes to foreign aid and hunger relief programs. He proposed establishing a “hunger czar position” to take on food issues. McGovern also took part in the Food stamp challenge, which entailed living on the average $21 in food stamps over the course of a week.[39]

Immigration

McGovern has voted against major efforts to restrict illegal immigration, including the REAL ID Act of 2005,[40] the Border Protection, Anti-terrorism, and Illegal Immigration Control Act of 2005,[41] and the Secure Fence Act of 2006.[42]

Health care

McGovern believes health care is a human right. He voted for the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010, ultimately pushing for a robust public option which wasn’t included in the final measure.[39] He supports Medicare for All.[43]

Corporate personhood

In 2010, McGovern said that he thought the Supreme Court’s Citizen’s United case was wrongly decided, and that money does not equal free speech. He elaborated, saying that corporations should not “have the same equality as a regular voter.” At first he said that “the Constitution was wrong,” but he later said that he had misspoken. On November 15, 2011 McGovern introduced the , a proposal to limit the Constitution’s protections to only the rights of natural persons, and not corporations.[44] In January 2012, McGovern promoted his participation in a panel discussion entitled “Corporations are not people.”[45]
On July 14, 2014 McGovern introduced H.J. Res 119 with Representative Ted Deutch, which includes a section to address corporate personhood.

Social issues

McGovern has a pro-choice record on abortion. He voted against the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act in October 2003[46] and the Unborn Victims of Violence Act in February 2004.[47] He supports stem cell research, having voted in favor of the Stem Cell Research Enhancement Act in 2005, 2007, and 2009.[48] He voted for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act of 2007, which would have prevented employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.[49] He voted against the Federal Marriage Amendment, which would have constitutionally outlawed same-sex marriage, in 2004 and 2006,[50] and co-sponsored the Respect for Marriage Act of 2009, which would allow the federal government to recognize same-sex marriages.[51]

Objection of 2016 presidential election results

On January 6, 2017, McGovern objected to the 9 electoral votes from Alabama, which Donald Trump had won with 62.08% of the vote.[52] Because no senator joined his objection, the objection was dismissed.[53]

Foreign policy and human rights

China

On July 21, 2019, McGovern described attacks against Hong Kong’s anti-extradition bill protesters as “orchestrated violence against peaceful protesters” and urged Hong Kong authorities to protect the freedom of demonstration.[54]

Iraq

McGovern has vocally opposed the Iraq War since its inception.[10] He voted against the initial authorization of military force against Iraq in October 2002.[55] In May 2007, McGovern introduced H.R. 2237, to “provide for the redeployment of United States Armed Forces and defense contractors from Iraq.” The bill failed with a vote of 255 to 171.

Afghanistan

He initially supported the War in Afghanistan, but has become increasingly skeptical of the war. In June 2010 he pushed a funding amendment which would require President Barack Obama to provide for a draw-down plan before any further funding would be authorized. “Let us not waste, you know, more resources, more lives, on a policy that quite frankly is going to lead us nowhere,” said McGovern. “We need to let Afghan President Hamid Karzai know that we’re not a cheap date. We expect him to clean up his government.”[56]

Sudan

McGovern has been a prominent voice against the Islamist governments of Sudan for its prosecution of the war in Darfur. He has been arrested three times, twice during protests outside the Sudanese Embassy in Washington D.C. On April 28, 2006, he was one of five members of Congress arrested while protesting atrocities in the Darfur region.[57] Also arrested were U.S. Representatives Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas), Jim Moran (D-Virginia), Rep. John Olver (D-Massachusetts), and Tom Lantos (D-California). McGovern was arrested again at the Sudanese embassy on April 27, 2009, this time accompanied by Reps John Lewis (D-Georgia), Donna Edwards (D-Maryland), Lynn Woolsey (D-California), and Keith Ellison (D-Minnesota).[58] He was arrested again on March 16, 2012 alongside George Clooney during a protest outside of the Sudanese embassy speaking out against the Bashir regime in the Sudan.[59]

In April 2007, he called for the United States and other countries to boycott the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China to protest the Chinese government’s support of the Sudanese government and, by extension, the genocide in Darfur.[60]

Colombia

McGovern has traveled several times to Colombia to meet with human rights advocates, and has been very critical of Plan Colombia and US military aid to that country. On March 25, 2008, The Wall Street Journal published an unsigned editorial suggesting that McGovern supported the Marxist FARC rebels in Colombia. According to the Journal, an investigation of the computer hard drive of the recently killed Raúl Reyes, second-in-command of the FARC, had turned up material indicating “an ardent effort” on the part of McGovern “to do business directly with the FARC.” The article said that McGovern had been “working with an American go-between, who has been offering the rebels help in undermining Colombia’s elected and popular government.”[61] In response to these charges, McGovern said that his concern was to help win the release of hostages held by the FARC, as requested by several families of Americans held by the FARC.[62] He said that he had no sympathy for the rebels or for their hostage-taking.

On February 13, 2009, McGovern offered a resolution on the subject of the trial of the Iranian Baháʼí Faith leadership co-sponsored by seven others in H.Res. 175.[63] The situation has gathered international attention including defense of Nobel Laureate attorney Shirin Ebadi in June[64] after she received threats in April warning her against making speeches abroad, and defending Iran’s minority Baháʼí community[65] (See Arrest of Baháʼí leaders).

Cuba

McGovern advocates for normalizing diplomatic relations with Cuba.[66] He accompanied President Barack Obama to the island in 2016.[67] He said at the time that “Americans have long been ready for a 21st century approach to Cuba and with our two nations working together, we can create new opportunities for American businesses, increase travel and exchange, and support efforts in Cuba to advance democratic reforms and promote human rights.” [67] He also joined Secretary of State John Kerry on a 2019 trip to re-open the U.S. embassy in Havana.

In 2000, McGovern met with the Cuban grandmothers of five-year-old Elian Gonzalez.[68] Elian’s mother had drowned while trying to escape from Cuba with the boy. Although Elian had reached Florida safely, McGovern advocated the boy’s return to his father’s custody in Cuba.[69]

In 2002 McGovern joined the Congressional Cuba Working Group, which advocated for lowering restrictions on travel and food shipment to Cuba.[10] He is the current co-chair of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission (formerly the “Human Rights Caucus”).[70] His work on human rights issues earned him the Washington Office on Latin America’s “Human Rights Award” in 2007.[71]

Myanmar

On November 18, 2013, McGovern introduced House Resolution 418.[72] The resolution calls on the government of Myanmar to end the persecution and discrimination of the Rohingya people within its borders and calls on the United States government and the international community to pressure the Burmese to do so.[72][73] The resolution is in response to allegations of Burmese Buddhist attacks on Rohingya Muslims that may have occurred earlier in 2014.[73] McGovern argued that “the Burmese government needs to recognize the Rohingya as an ethnic group. The situation is dire and rapidly deteriorating.”[73]

Other work

On April 25, 2018, 57 members of the House of Representatives, including McGovern,[74] released a condemnation of Holocaust distortion in Ukraine and Poland.[75] They criticized the Poland’s new Holocaust law and Ukraine’s 2015 memory laws glorifying Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA) and its leaders, such as Roman Shukhevych.[74]

Committee assignments

Caucus memberships

Political positions

(l–r) McGovern campaigning in 2012 on behalf of U.S. Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren, alongside Lieutenant Governor Tim Murray at an Auburn rally.

McGovern has aligned himself with liberal and progressive causes. “It’s no secret that I’m a liberal,” he said in 2010. “I didn’t poll any of this stuff, but I am who I am.”[82] Political interest groups generally rank McGovern as one of the most liberal members of Congress. The National Journal ranked him among the seven most liberal representatives.[7] The Washington Post noted that the political similarities between McGovern and his mentor, 1972 Democratic presidential nominee George McGovern, are numerous: “Both are considered among the most liberal and anti-war lawmakers of their generation. The most prominent difference? They aren’t related.”[39]

From 1997 to 2007, the liberal advocacy group Americans for Democratic Action gave him an average vote rating of 98.5 percent, whereas its conservative counterpart, the American Conservative Union, gave him an average vote rating of 2.5 percent.[83] The United States Chamber of Commerce, which advocates for business-oriented policies, has given McGovern a 33 percent lifetime rating as of 2011.[84]

Family and personal life

McGovern and Wife Lisa Murray McGovern in 2020 attend the laying in state of Georgia Congressman John Lewis.

McGovern lives in Worcester with his wife, Lisa Murray McGovern, a former aide to U.S. Representative Gerry Studds. They have two children, Patrick and Molly. He has two sisters, who are teachers in the Worcester public school system.[85]

In November 2010 he underwent surgery to remove his thyroid gland after being diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer, from which he has recovered.[86]

McGovern is Roman Catholic and says that his legislative initiatives such as increased spending on global nutrition and raising taxes on higher income earners originate from the Catholic Church’s efforts to serve the poor.[87] McGovern has also said that he draws inspiration from Jesuit values, and in particular from his work as a congressional staffer to investigate the 1989 murders of Jesuits in El Salvador. McGovern told America Magazine in 2019 “I realized that if you commit yourself to a certain set of values, a life of service, if you are committed to lifting up the poor and standing with the poor, there’s something about that that can be very satisfying. It makes you feel like you’re living a life that’s worthwhile.”[88]

Electoral history

Democratic candidateRepublican candidateOther candidate
   
YearCandidateVotesCandidateVotesCandidatePartyVotes
1996Jim McGovern135,04752.9%Peter Blute (Incumbent)115,69545.4%Natural Law3,3631.3%
1998Jim McGovern (Incumbent)108,61356.9%Matthew J. Amorello79,17441.5%George PhilliesLibertarian2,8871.1%
2000Jim McGovern (Incumbent)213,06598.8%NoneNone
2002Jim McGovern (Incumbent)155,69798.8%NoneNone
2004Jim McGovern (Incumbent)192,03670.5%80,19729.4%None
2006Jim McGovern (Incumbent)166,97398.8%NoneNone
2008Jim McGovern (Incumbent)227,61998.5%NoneNone
2010Jim McGovern (Incumbent)122,35756.5%85,12439.2%Patrick BarronIndependent9,3884.3%
2012Jim McGovern (Incumbent)259,25798.5%NoneNone
2014Jim McGovern (Incumbent)169,14098.2%NoneNone
2016Jim McGovern (Incumbent)275,48798.2%NoneNone
2018Jim McGovern (incumbent)190,12967.2%92,97432.8%None
2020Jim McGovern (incumbent)249,85465.3%132,22034.6%None

Sources:[15][19][89]

References

General biographies

Footnotes

  1. ^ “When McGovern interned for McGovern (no relation)”. Roll Call. May 24, 2019. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  2. ^ Admin, C. H. C. (April 14, 2011). “Who We Are”. Congressional Hunger Center. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  3. ^ “McGovern-Dole a reminder of CCC authorities | The Hagstrom Report”. www.hagstromreport.com. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  4. ^ Smart, Catherine (September 20, 2016). “A James Beard award for fighting hunger? – The Boston Globe”. BostonGlobe.com. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  5. ^ “McGovern-Dole Leadership Award”. World Food Program USA. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  6. ^ “Caucus Members”. Congressional Progressive Caucus. Archived from the original on April 27, 2019. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  7. ^ a b “2007 Vote Ratings (03/07/2008)”. National Journal. Archived from the original on June 1, 2008. Retrieved August 23, 2010.
  8. ^ McGovern, Jim (December 6, 1998). “Statement of Candidacy”. Federal Election Commission. Archived from the original on June 4, 2015. Retrieved July 9, 2010.
  9. ^ a b McCarthy, Colman (November 19, 1996). “This time, an upset for McGovern”. The Washington Post. p. D20.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h Koszczuk & Angle 2007.
  11. ^ Sullivan, Patricia (December 15, 2009). “Leonel Gómez, Salvadoran human rights activist, dies”. The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on February 18, 2015. Retrieved April 19, 2021.
  12. ^ National Atlas Archived February 22, 2014, at the Wayback Machine
  13. ^ Connolly, Timothy J (September 8, 1994). “McGovern runs as Washington insider”. Telegram & Gazette.
  14. ^ Oliphant, Thomas (December 17, 1995). “Aiming at Newt through Blute”. The Boston Globe. p. A23. Archived from the original on January 11, 2012. Retrieved September 30, 2010.
  15. ^ a b c d Election results, 1996–2008:

  16. ^ Vennochi, John (May 20, 2004). “McGovern faces fight over ‘values. The Boston Globe. p. A19. Archived from the original on August 12, 2004. Retrieved September 25, 2010.
  17. ^ Dayal, Priyanka (September 15, 2010). “Lamb takes GOP: Winner faces McGovern in November”. Telegram & Gazette. Worcester, Massachusetts. Archived from the original on April 4, 2012. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  18. ^ Dayal, Priyanka (September 1, 2010). “Barron qualifies for Nov. 2 ballot: ‘Low-budget campaign’ planned”. Telegram & Gazette. Worcester, Massachusetts. Archived from the original on April 4, 2012. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  19. ^ a b Election results, 2010:

  20. ^ Caygle, Heather. “McGovern picked as top Democrat on Rules panel”. POLITICO. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  21. ^ Robinson, James A. (1961). “The Role of the Rules Committee in Regulating Debate in the U.S. House of Representatives”. Midwest Journal of Political Science. 5 (1): 59–69. doi:10.2307/2109042. ISSN 0026-3397. JSTOR 2109042.
  22. ^ “About”. House of Representatives Committee on Rules. December 19, 2013. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  23. ^ McGovern, Nancy Pelosi and Jim. “Nancy Pelosi and Jim McGovern: House Democrats will restore transparency, ethics, unity”. USA TODAY. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  24. ^ “Jim McGovern on the House’s new rules | Boston.com”. www.boston.com. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  25. ^ Finucane, Martin (December 17, 2019). “Mass.’s McGovern in the spotlight as Rules Committee discusses impeachment vote – The Boston Globe”. BostonGlobe.com. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  26. ^ McGovern, Jim (October 30, 2019). “Setting the rules for the impeachment inquiry – The Boston Globe”. BostonGlobe.com. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  27. ^ McGovern, Jim (December 18, 2019). “Why impeachment matters – The Boston Globe”. BostonGlobe.com. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  28. ^ https://twitter.com/RepMcGovern/status/1347228980546576384. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  29. ^ Hohler, Bob; Globe Staff (November 19, 1999). “Hard-dealing congressmen reap $760M for Bay State”. The Boston Globe. p. A1. Archived from the original on January 11, 2012. Retrieved September 25, 2010.
  30. ^ H.R. 5140
  31. ^ H.R. 1424
  32. ^ H.R. 1
  33. ^ Espo, David (February 25, 2009). “House OKs $410B bill to boost domestic programs”. KPFA Evening News.
  34. ^ H.J.Res. 45
  35. ^ Black, Chris (September 30, 1998). “Senate backs college aid bill: Hurdle cleared for rise in student grants, loans”. The Boston Globe. p. A3. Archived from the original on January 11, 2012. Retrieved September 25, 2010.
  36. ^ Vallejo, Stephanie (June 10, 2010). “McGovern, Rachael Ray push for child nutrition programs”. The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on October 19, 2011. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  37. ^ Morgan, Dan (July 27, 2007). “House rejects Farm Bill”. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on November 11, 2012. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  38. ^ Morgan, Dan (May 6, 2008). “Farm Bill negotiators cut funds for overseas school lunch program”. The Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 21, 2010. Retrieved September 26, 2010.
  39. ^ a b c “James P. McGovern (D-Mass.)”. Who Runs Gov. The Washington Post. July 23, 2012. Archived from the original on March 11, 2016. Retrieved September 1, 2017.
  40. ^ H.R. 418, incorporated into H.R. 1268
  41. ^ H.R. 4437
  42. ^ H.R. 6061
  43. ^ “Tell Congress: Pass Medicare for All!”.
  44. ^ H.J.Res. 88
  45. ^ McGovern, Jim. “Corporations are not people: A special panel with Sen. Eldridge, John Bonifaz, and Jeff Clements”. BlueMassGroup. Archived from the original on June 23, 2012. Retrieved June 21, 2012.
  46. ^ S. 3
  47. ^ H.R. 1997
  48. ^ H.R. 810, H.R. 3, and H.R. 873
  49. ^ H.R. 3685
  50. ^ H.J.Res. 106, H.J.Res. 88
  51. ^ H.R. 3567
  52. ^ “Alabama Election Results 2016 – The New York Times”. Retrieved November 10, 2016.
  53. ^ “11 times VP Biden was interrupted during Trump’s electoral vote certification | CNN Politics”. January 6, 2017.
  54. ^ Cheng, Kris (July 22, 2019). “Hong Kong police made no arrests after mob assaulted commuters, protesters, journalists in Yuen Long”. Hong Kong Free Press. Archived from the original on July 22, 2019. Retrieved July 22, 2019. Meanwhile, US House Representative Jim McGovern, a co-chair of the Congressional Executive-Commission on China, condemned the “orchestrated violence against peaceful protesters” as unacceptable.
  55. ^ H.J.Res. 114
  56. ^ “Russian Spy Confesses; President Obama Speaks on Immigration Reform; Hurricane Alex Complicates Gulf Oil Cleanup”. The Situation Room. July 1, 2010. CNN. Transcript.
  57. ^ Doyle, Jim (April 28, 2006). “Five members of Congress arrested over Sudan protest”. San Francisco Chronicle. Archived from the original on May 4, 2006. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  58. ^ Rhee, Foon (April 27, 2009). “McGovern, other lawmakers arrested at Darfur protest”. Boston Globe. Archived from the original on April 30, 2009. Retrieved February 23, 2010.
  59. ^ Corcoran, Lindsay. “McGovern Arrested During Protest in D.C.” The Westborough Daily Voice. Archived from the original on February 21, 2014. Retrieved July 19, 2012.
  60. ^ Melady, Mark (April 14, 2007). “McGovern suggests boycott of Olympics”. Telegram & Gazette. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007. Retrieved April 14, 2007.
  61. ^ “Review & Outlook: A FARC Fan’s Notes”. The Wall Street Journal. March 25, 2008. Archived from the original on March 27, 2008. Retrieved June 23, 2008.
  62. ^ “McGovern angry over claim he backs Colombian rebels”. Telegram & Gazette. March 26, 2008. Archived from the original on August 14, 2009. Retrieved February 23, 2010.
  63. ^ “Condemning the Government of Iran for its state-sponsored persecution of its Baháʼí minority and its continued violation of the International Covenants on Human Rights. (Introduced in House)” (Press release). House of Representatives, Congressional Record. February 13, 2009. Archived from the original on October 9, 2013. Retrieved March 1, 2009.
  64. ^ “Local Baha’is worry about their fellow believers in Iran”. The Chatham News (Press release). February 24, 2009. Archived from the original on July 3, 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2009.
  65. ^ “Top Iranian dissident threatened”. BBC News. April 14, 2008. Archived from the original on April 20, 2008.
  66. ^ “Rep. McGovern: ‘We Should Have Normal Relations With Cuba. News. April 3, 2019. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  67. ^ a b Gazett Staff (March 12, 2016). “McGovern will go to Cuba with Obama”. Daily Hampshire Gazette. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  68. ^ Alvarez, Lizette (January 26, 2000). “Private Meeting Is Planned For Boy and Grandmothers”. The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  69. ^ “Grandmothers Lobby At Capitol For Elian’s Return”. Sun-Sentinel. January 26, 2000. Archived from the original on June 29, 2013. Retrieved July 30, 2012.
  70. ^ “About the Committee”. Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission. December 19, 2013. Archived from the original on October 8, 2017. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  71. ^ “The WOLA Human Rights Awards Ceremony & Benefit Gala”. Washington Office On Latin America. Archived from the original on November 7, 2017. Retrieved November 1, 2017.
  72. ^ a b “H.Res. 418 – Summary”. United States Congress. Archived from the original on May 9, 2014. Retrieved May 5, 2014.
  73. ^ a b c Marcos, Cristina (May 7, 2014). “House passes resolution pressuring Burmese government to end genocide”. The Hill. Archived from the original on May 8, 2014. Retrieved May 8, 2014.
  74. ^ a b History, Defending (April 25, 2018). “57 Members of US House of Representatives Condemn Holocaust Distortion in Ukraine and Poland”. Archived from the original on January 10, 2019. Retrieved January 18, 2019.
  75. ^ “Congress members urge US stand against Holocaust denial in Ukraine, Poland”. The Times of Israel. April 25, 2018. Archived from the original on January 19, 2019. Retrieved January 18, 2019.
  76. ^ “Members”. House Baltic Caucus. Archived from the original on February 21, 2018. Retrieved February 21, 2018.
  77. ^ “Membership”. Congressional Arts Caucus. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved March 21, 2018.
  78. ^ “Members”. Afterschool Alliance. Archived from the original on October 12, 2018. Retrieved April 17, 2018.
  79. ^ “Members”. Congressional NextGen 9-1-1 Caucus. Archived from the original on June 12, 2018. Retrieved June 11, 2018.
  80. ^ “Members of the Veterinary Medicine Caucus”. Veterinary Medicine Caucus. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved October 12, 2018.
  81. ^ “Caucus Membrs”. US House of Representatives. Retrieved January 3, 2021.
  82. ^ Slack, Donovan (August 28, 2010). “Running hard against the Scott Brown effect”. The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on January 6, 2012. Retrieved September 25, 2010.
  83. ^ Data assembled from Koszczuk & Angle 2007 and previous editions.
  84. ^ “How They Voted 2011 – House”. United States Chamber of Commerce. Archived from the original on February 16, 2013. Retrieved February 2, 2013.
  85. ^ McGovern 2010.
  86. ^ “Rep. McGovern has surgery for thyroid cancer”. The Boston Globe. November 8, 2010. Archived from the original on November 11, 2010. Retrieved November 8, 2010.
  87. ^ Lednicer, Lisa Grace (March 31, 2014). Written at District of Columbia. “Massachusetts Catholics in Congress — accustomed to being shunned by the Vatican — are encouraged by thaw under Pope Francis”. The Boston Globe. Boston: Boston Globe Media Partners. Archived from the original on April 6, 2014. Retrieved January 7, 2019. From the beginning, Representative Jim McGovern’s political life was entwined with his Catholic faith. As a young aide to Democratic Representative Joe Moakley in the early 1990s, McGovern led an investigation into the murders of six Jesuits and two lay women in El Salvador. As a congressman, he has pushed for more spending on global nutrition, higher taxes on the wealthy, and other positions that, he says, derive from the Catholic Church’s mission to serve the poor.
  88. ^ “Martyred Jesuits inspired work and faith of Massachusetts congressman”. America Magazine. November 6, 2019. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  89. ^ “Massachusetts Election Results 2018: Live Midterm Map by County & Analysis”. Archived from the original on November 15, 2018. Retrieved November 21, 2018.

Further reading

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts’s 3rd congressional district

1997–2013
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts’s 2nd congressional district

2013–present
Incumbent
Preceded by

Chair of the House Human Rights Commission
2008–2011
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Ranking Member of the House Human Rights Commission
2011–2019
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Ranking Member of the House Rules Committee
2018–2019
Succeeded by

Preceded by

Chair of the House Rules Committee
2019–present
Incumbent
Preceded by

Chair of the House Human Rights Commission
2019–present
Preceded by

Chair of the Joint China Commission
2019–2021
Succeeded by

U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by

United States representatives by seniority
39th
Succeeded by


Issues

Source: Government page

Committees

Chairman of the House Committee on Rules
Chairman of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China
Co-Chair of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission
Member of the House Committee on Agriculture, Subcommittee on Nutrition, Oversight, and Department Operations

Legislation

Sponsored and Cosponsored

Issues

X
Lori TrahanLori Trahan – MA3

Current Position: US Representative for MA US House District 3 since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat

She joined the staff of former Congressman Marty Meehan as a scheduler, eventually working her way up to Chief of Staff. Following her public service, Lori began working in the private sector as the only female executive at a tech company before moving on to cofound a woman owned and operated consulting firm, Concire, where she advised various companies on business strategy, how to create the conditions for employees – especially women – to thrive.

As a member of the House Education and Labor and House Armed Services Committees, Lori is focused on fighting for working families on issues such as affordable health care, quality public education, workforce development, the environment, and working to end the pain and suffering of the opioid crisis. Lori is the first Portuguese-American woman elected to Congress and is a member of the New Dems and the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

Source: Government page

Today, Congresswoman Lori Trahan highlighted a new report from the Joint Economic Committee estimating that 83,000 monthly Child Tax Credit payments were sent to families in the Third District in August. A total of $33.7 in tax cuts went back in the pockets of hardworking district families, the most of any district in the Commonwealth.

“The historic expansion of the Child Tax Credit that we passed as part of the American Rescue Plan is putting more of hardworking families’ own money back in their pockets so they can cover child care payments, put gas in the car, put food on the table, spend money at local businesses, and grow our local economy. It’s clear that the strengthened tax credit is a tremendous success, which is why we must extend it into the future when we make President Biden’s Build Back Better Act law in the coming weeks,” said Congresswoman Trahan.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MA US House District 3 since 2019
Affiliation: Democrat

She joined the staff of former Congressman Marty Meehan as a scheduler, eventually working her way up to Chief of Staff. Following her public service, Lori began working in the private sector as the only female executive at a tech company before moving on to cofound a woman owned and operated consulting firm, Concire, where she advised various companies on business strategy, how to create the conditions for employees – especially women – to thrive.

As a member of the House Education and Labor and House Armed Services Committees, Lori is focused on fighting for working families on issues such as affordable health care, quality public education, workforce development, the environment, and working to end the pain and suffering of the opioid crisis. Lori is the first Portuguese-American woman elected to Congress and is a member of the New Dems and the Congressional Progressive Caucus.

Source: Government page

News

Today, Congresswoman Lori Trahan highlighted a new report from the Joint Economic Committee estimating that 83,000 monthly Child Tax Credit payments were sent to families in the Third District in August. A total of $33.7 in tax cuts went back in the pockets of hardworking district families, the most of any district in the Commonwealth.

“The historic expansion of the Child Tax Credit that we passed as part of the American Rescue Plan is putting more of hardworking families’ own money back in their pockets so they can cover child care payments, put gas in the car, put food on the table, spend money at local businesses, and grow our local economy. It’s clear that the strengthened tax credit is a tremendous success, which is why we must extend it into the future when we make President Biden’s Build Back Better Act law in the coming weeks,” said Congresswoman Trahan.

Twitter

About

Lori Trahan 2

Source: Government page

Growing up in a working-class family in Lowell, Massachusetts, Lori Trahan experienced firsthand the principles of sacrifice, hard work, and grit. Her father was a union ironworker, and her mother, a domestic worker, juggled several part-time jobs while raising Lori and her three sisters.

The first in her family to graduate college, Lori earned a scholarship to play Division 1 volleyball at Georgetown University. Her four years as an NCAA athlete were rewarding yet challenging; what she would later highlight in Congress as the organization’s exploitative business model, she herself experienced, struggling to make ends meet because she was not allowed to earn additional income from endorsements or interviews. Like many, Lori was introduced to public service as a college student in Washington D.C. After completing her Bachelor’s in Comparative and Regional Studies in International Relations, she joined former Congressman Marty Meehan’s staff as a scheduler, eventually working her way up to Chief of Staff. She deeply enjoyed working to serve the people of Massachusetts, and was inspired by Congressman Meehan’s leadership and resilience; however, with Newt Gingrich as the Speaker of the House, she witnessed firsthand increasing partisanship that served wealthy special interests instead of the people.

Sickened by the deep polarization taking hold of Washington, Lori moved to the private sector as the only female executive at a tech company. Her passion for bringing women into leadership positions led her to be a cofounder of Concire, a women owned and operated consulting firm. In her years spent at Concire, she advised various companies on business strategy and how to create the ideal conditions for employees – especially women – to thrive.

Lori successfully ran for Congress in 2018, motivated to return to public service after seeing the detrimental gridlock and lack of accountability from the Trump administration. Sworn in alongside a historically diverse class of new members, Lori immediately got to work for the Third District: she enacted legislation adding the Nashua River to the National Wild and Scenic River System to protect the river for generations to come; she secured over $30 million in funding increases for Massachusetts-based businesses that develop defense materials to keep servicemembers safe; and she established a Veterans Advisory Council to ensure our veterans receive the highest degree of attention and expertise.

In her first term, she served on the House Committee on Education and Labor, as well as the House Armed Services Committee. Her work serving the people of Massachusetts started close to home. She introduced the Leonel Rondon Pipeline Safety Act in response to the tragic Merrimack Valley gas explosions that claimed the life of 18-year old Leonel Rondon and injured many more. This act, signed into law on December 28, 2020, puts in place measures that will prevent another such disaster.

One of Lori’s first priorities was to address the devastating opioid epidemic ravaging our nation. She introduced the MATE (Medication Access and Training Expansion) Act, which standardizes addiction training and equips medical professionals with the tools necessary to prevent, identify, treat, and manage patients with opioid and other substance use disorders. With the added detriment of the COVID-19 pandemic, Lori believes that mental health and substance use disorder must be kept at the forefront of the federal response to COVID-19.

Now, serving as a member of the powerful House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Lori is determined to advocate for Bay State residents on pressing issues, including making healthcare more affordable, addressing climate change, protecting kids online, and fighting disinformation in our media. To further her ability to weigh in on these issues on behalf of the hardworking families she represents, Lori secured appointments to the Subcommittees on Health, Consumer Protection and Commerce, and Oversight and Investigations.

In March 2020, the world jolted to a halt with the coronavirus pandemic. Lori rolled up her sleeves to deliver essential support to families, frontline workers, small businesses, and students. She introduced the Pandemic Production Act, which aims to end the United States’ dependence on a foreign supply chain of essential PPE and ensures our health care workers have the equipment they need to do their jobs safely. Additionally, Lori secured federal funding for Community Health Centers and Community Action Agencies across the Third District working to provide critical services to low-income and traditionally underserved families. As communities and businesses in the Third District work to get on the path to recovery, Lori is committed to seeing that they cross the finish line and get back on their feet – and do so stronger than before.

Web

Government Page, Campaign Site, Twitter, Facebook, Wikipedia

X
Katherine ClarkKatherine Clark – MA5

Current Position: US Representative for MA US House District 5 since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2011 – 2013; State Delegate from 2008 – 2011

Other Position:
Assistant Speaker of the House

Featured Quote: 
In #200Days, we’ve made historic investments in American families to stabilize our #childcare system and cut poverty in half. Just think about what we can accomplish in the next 200 days, and beyond, to put women, families, and equity first.

Featured Video: 
Full Katherine Clark: House’s ‘Archaic Rules’ Are A Distraction | MTP Daily | MSNBC

Assistant Speaker Clark Statement on 20th Anniversary of 9/11
Congresswoman WebpageSeptember 11, 2021 (Short)

Assistant Speaker Katherine Clark (MA-5) released the following statement in advance of the 20th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the deadliest terrorist attack in United States history.

“Today marks twenty years since our nation was attacked and forever reshaped. To the brave service members and first responders who sacrificed their lives, their health, and their wellbeing on that day, and in the years since, we are profoundly grateful. To the family members of those fallen, we honor the memory of your loved ones and your incredible loss. To the Muslim Americans who have suffered discrimination in the wake of 9/11, we vow to do better. And to the children who have grown up never knowing an America not at war, we will continue our work for peace.

Summary

Current Position: US Representative for MA US House District 5 since 2013
Affiliation: Democrat
Former Position(s): State Senator from 2011 – 2013; State Delegate from 2008 – 2011

Other Position:
Assistant Speaker of the House

Featured Quote: 
In #200Days, we’ve made historic investments in American families to stabilize our #childcare system and cut poverty in half. Just think about what we can accomplish in the next 200 days, and beyond, to put women, families, and equity first.

Featured Video: 
Full Katherine Clark: House’s ‘Archaic Rules’ Are A Distraction | MTP Daily | MSNBC

News

Assistant Speaker Clark Statement on 20th Anniversary of 9/11
Congresswoman WebpageSeptember 11, 2021 (Short)

Assistant Speaker Katherine Clark (MA-5) released the following statement in advance of the 20th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the deadliest terrorist attack in United States history.

“Today marks twenty years since our nation was attacked and forever reshaped. To the brave service members and first responders who sacrificed their lives, their health, and their wellbeing on that day, and in the years since, we are profoundly grateful. To the family members of those fallen, we honor the memory of your loved ones and your incredible loss. To the Muslim Americans who have suffered discrimination in the wake of 9/11, we vow to do better. And to the children who have grown up never knowing an America not at war, we will continue our work for peace.

Twitter

About

Katherine Clark 2

Source: Government page

Congresswoman Katherine Clark proudly serves the Fifth District of Massachusetts. She was first elected in a special election in December of 2013.

Katherine’s career in public service is driven by her commitment to helping children and families succeed. She is a vocal advocate for ending wage discrimination, protecting women’s health care, access to affordable, high-quality child care, paid family leave, safer schools, and other reforms to address the challenges women and families face. She believes that Congress must work to end the glaring disconnect between the needs of families at home and priorities in Washington.

In Congress, she brings her experience as a state senator, state representative, general counsel for the Massachusetts Office of Child Care Services, and policy chief for the state attorney general.

Katherine represents a diverse district comprised of 24 cities and towns that stretch from the coastal communities of Revere and Winthrop through the economic engine of MetroWest.

In fall 2020, she was elected by her colleagues to serve as Assistant Speaker of the 117th Congress after serving as the Vice Chair of the House Democratic Caucus during the previous session. Additionally, she serves as a member of the Steering and Policy Committee within the Caucus.

Katherine is a member of the U.S. House Committee on Appropriations and three subcommittees within Appropriations: Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies; Legislative Branch; and Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies.

Katherine is a proud member of several caucuses in Congress, including the Congressional Progressive Caucus and the Women’s Caucus.

Katherine, her husband Rodney, and their three children Addison, Riley, and Nathaniel live in Melrose.

Voting Record

Votes on Bills

Caucuses 

Offices

WASHINGTON, DC OFFICE

2448 Rayburn House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515
Phone: (202) 225-2836
Hours: To mitigate the spread of coronavirus, D.C. office staff will be working remotely. Please call if you need assistance.

DISTRICT OFFICE

157 Pleasant St, Suite 4
Malden, MA 02148
Phone: (617) 354-0292
Hours: To mitigate the spread of coronavirus, District office staff will be working remotely. Please call if you need assistance.

METROWEST REGIONAL OFFICE

By appointment only
116 Concord Street, Suite 1
Framingham, MA 01702
Phone: (508) 319-9757

 

Contact

Email:

Web

Government Page, Twitter, YouTube

Politics

Source: none

Campaign Finance

Open Secrets

Voting Record

VoteSmart – National Key Votes & Ratings

Search

Google

Wikipedia Entry

Katherine Marlea Clark (born July 17, 1963) is an American politician who has served as the United States representative for Massachusetts’s 5th congressional district since 2013, and as the assistant House Democratic leader (officially, the “Assistant Speaker“) since 2021, making her the fourth-highest-ranking House Democrat. Her district includes many of Boston‘s northern and western suburbs, such as Medford, Framingham, Woburn, Waltham, and Clark’s hometown of Melrose. A member of the Democratic Party, Clark was a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives from 2008 to 2011, and of the Massachusetts Senate from 2011 to 2013.

Born in Connecticut, Clark worked as an attorney in several states, before moving to Massachusetts in 1995, where she worked in state government. She joined the Melrose School Committee in 2002, becoming committee chair in 2005. She was first elected to the state legislature in 2008, and contributed to legislation regarding criminal justice, education, and municipal pensions. She won the 2013 special election for the U.S. House of Representatives, to succeed Ed Markey, in the 5th district, and sits on the House Appropriations Committee.

Early life and career

Katherine Marlea Clark[1] was born on July 17, 1963, in New Haven, Connecticut.[2] She attended St. Lawrence University, Cornell Law School, and Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government.[3] She studied in Nagoya, Japan, in 1983.[1]

In her early career, she worked as an attorney in Chicago. She then moved to Colorado, where she worked as a clerk for Judge Alfred A. Arraj of the United States District Court for the District of Colorado and later as a staff attorney for the Colorado District Attorneys’ Council.[4] She moved to Massachusetts in 1995 and became general counsel for the state Office of Child Care Services.[5]

Local politics

In 2001, Clark moved to Melrose, where she was elected to the Melrose School Committee, taking her seat in January 2002.[4] She first ran for the Massachusetts Senate in 2004 and lost to Republican incumbent Richard Tisei.[6][7] In January 2005, she was unanimously elected chairwoman of the Melrose School Committee.[8] In 2006, she ran for the 32nd Middlesex seat in the Massachusetts House of Representatives when incumbent Mike Festa began a run for Middlesex district attorney but withdrew after he dropped out of the race.[9]

Clark was appointed co-chair of Victory 2006, the state Democratic Party’s campaign and fundraising effort for the 2006 gubernatorial election.[10] She spent some time as Chief of Policy and Government Relations in the Massachusetts Attorney General‘s office.[11]

Massachusetts legislature

At an event with then-U.S. Representative Ed Markey in 2008.

At an event with then-U.S. Representative Ed Markey in 2008.

Massachusetts House of Representatives

Festa resigned his state House seat in October 2007 to become Secretary of Elder Affairs in the Deval Patrick administration, and Clark entered the special election to succeed him. During the campaign, she emphasized her experience as an attorney and made “developing stability in state aid” her top policy issue. She won the Democratic primary in January with 65% of the vote, defeating two other Melrose Democrats.[11][12] She defeated Republican real estate businessman Mark B. Hutchison, 63% to 37%.[13][14] In November 2008, she was reelected to a full term unopposed.[15]

Sworn in on March 13, 2008,[16] Clark represented Melrose and Wakefield. She served on the Education, Judiciary, and Municipalities and Regional Government Committees.[17]

Massachusetts Senate

When Tisei resigned his state senate seat to run for lieutenant governor of Massachusetts, Clark ran for his seat. In the Democratic primary, she defeated Stoneham attorney Michael S. Day, 64%–36%.[18][19] In the November 2010 general election, she defeated Republican Craig Spadafora, 52%–48%.[20]

Clark was sworn in on January 5, 2011.[21] She is a pro-choice legislator and has been endorsed in her campaigns by NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts and the Planned Parenthood Advocacy Fund.[22][23][24]

In 2011, Clark was co-chair of the Joint Committee on Public Service, where she was lead author of the Senate version of a bill to reform municipal pensions.[25][26] For her work in 2011, she received legislator of the year awards from the Massachusetts Municipal Association and the Massachusetts Police Association.[27][28] In 2012, she authored a law that takes steps to ensure that all Massachusetts students read at grade level by third grade.[29] Also in 2012, her bill extending restraining orders in domestic violence cases to cover victims’ pets, which are often used as pawns in abusive relationships, was signed as part of a larger law on animal shelters.[30][31] In 2013, she co-sponsored a bill expanding the state’s wiretapping authority, which was strictly limited under existing law, in order to help police better investigate violent street crime.[32] At the same time, she co-sponsored a bill to secure electronic privacy protections, requiring police to have probable cause before investigating the electronic records of individuals.[33] She filed another bill tightening sex offender laws, imposing stricter penalties and making offender data more accessible to agencies and the public.[34][35] The Women’s Bar Association of Massachusetts named Clark its 2013 Legislator of the Year for her service on women’s issues.[36]

Clark’s committee assignments in the state Senate were as follows:

  • Judiciary (Chair)
  • Mental Health and Substance Abuse (Vice Chair)
  • Post Audit and Oversight (Vice Chair)
  • Public Health
  • Public Safety and Homeland Security
  • Steering and Policy (Chair)[37]

U.S House of Representatives

Elections

2013 special

Clark was the Democratic nominee in the 2013 special election for the U.S. House of Representatives in Massachusetts’s 5th congressional district. The district’s longtime incumbent, Ed Markey, had just been elected to the United States Senate six months into his 19th term. In a heavily contested Democratic primary—the real contest in this heavily Democratic district—she was endorsed by Massachusetts attorney general Martha Coakley[38] and EMILY’s List.[39] On October 15, 2013, she won the primary with a plurality of 32% of the vote. Her closest competitor was Middlesex County Sheriff Peter Koutoujian, with 22% of the vote.[40][41] On December 10, as expected, she easily won the special election.[42]

Tenure

Clark was sworn into office on December 12, 2013, and sits on the House Appropriations Committee.[43] In a 2014 interview with The Boston Globe, she compared life in Washington to the television series House of Cards, saying “It’s exactly like here, minus the murders.”[44]

Clark was unopposed in her bid for a full term in 2014.

In March 2015, Clark decided not to attend the speech by Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu before a joint session of Congress. She affirmed a commitment to maintaining and strengthening the relationship between the U.S. and Israel but noted that the invitation was offered without first consulting the Obama administration.[45]

Clark has introduced legislation in response to Internet harassment, most notably resulting from the Gamergate controversy, and has advocated for more stringent enforcement of existing laws.[46] After introducing legislation that would criminalize “swatting” (falsely reporting an ongoing critical incident to dispatch an emergency response), she was herself targeted by a false report of an active shooter at her home.[47][48]

In January 2017, Clark announced a boycott of Donald Trump’s inauguration. She was part of a small group of House and Senate members who chose to boycott the ceremony. Her reason was her desire not to “normalize” Trump’s promotion of “bigoted, misogynist, anti-Semitic, and racist claims.”[49]

House Democratic Caucus vice chair

On November 28, 2018, it was announced that Clark had defeated California congressman Pete Aguilar to succeed Linda Sánchez as Vice Chair of the House Democratic Caucus.[50][51]

House Democratic assistant speaker

On November 18, 2020, it was announced that Clark had defeated Rhode Island congressman David Cicilline by a vote of 135 to 92 to succeed Ben Ray Luján as Assistant Speaker, the number four spot in Democratic house leadership.[52]

Clark has been mentioned as a possible candidate to succeed Pelosi as Speaker of the House.[53]

Committee assignments

  • Committee on Appropriations
    • Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education
    • Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development
    • Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch

Caucus memberships

  • Animal Protection Caucus
  • Armenian Caucus
  • Autism Caucus
  • Baby Caucus
  • Bicameral Task Force on Climate Change
  • Biomedical Research Caucus
  • Bipartisan Congressional Task Force on Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Career and Technical Education
  • Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC)
  • Congressional Women’s Caucus
  • Cranberry Caucus
  • Internet Caucus
  • Hellenic Caucus
  • Heroin Task Force
  • LGBT Equality Caucus
  • Medicare for All Caucus
  • Peace Corps Caucus
  • Pre-K Caucus
  • Prescription Drug Abuse Caucus
  • Safe Climate Caucus
  • Small Brewers Caucus
  • Sustainable Energy & Environment Coalition
  • Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission
  • Congressional Progressive Caucus[54]

Personal life

Clark is married to Rodney S. Dowell, Chief Bar Counsel for the Massachusetts Board of Bar Overseers, the state entity that regulates the legal profession in Massachusetts.[55] They live in Melrose and have three children, one of whom identifies as non-binary.[3][56]

When Congress is in session, Clark rooms with Representatives Annie Kuster, Grace Meng, Lois Frankel, Cheri Bustos, and Julia Brownley.[57]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Miller, John (December 4, 2013). “A look at the two candidates in Tuesday’s special election”. The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on March 11, 2020. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  2. ^ Welch, William F.; James, Stephen F., eds. (2009). “Katherine M. Clark”. Public Officers of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (2009–2010). Commonwealth of Massachusetts. p. 107. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved July 1, 2013.
  3. ^ a b “About”. State Senator Katherine Clark (official website). Archived from the original on September 27, 2013. Retrieved June 29, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Laidler, John (February 8, 2004). “Tisei faces rare challenge”. The Boston Globe.
  5. ^ Official Congressional Directory, 2013–2014 113th Congress. Joint Committee on Printing. 2014. pp. 128–129. ISBN 978-0-16-091922-0. Archived from the original on January 8, 2021. Retrieved November 28, 2020.
  6. ^ “MA State Senate – Middlesex & Essex Race – November 2, 2004”. Our Campaigns. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013.
  7. ^ Laidler, John (November 7, 2004). “Area GOP candidates strike out in 5 races”. The Boston Globe.
  8. ^ Cole, Caroline Louise (January 9, 2005). “Melrose: New leader for school board”. The Boston Globe.
  9. ^ Cole, Caroline Louise (March 16, 2006). “Melrose: Clark withdraws from race”. The Boston Globe.
  10. ^ Laidler, John (October 8, 2006). “Political Notebook: On the move to boost party”. The Boston Globe.
  11. ^ a b Laidler, John (February 10, 2008). “Primaries over, final races begin”. The Boston Globe.
  12. ^ “MA State House – Thirty-Second Middlesex – Special Election – D Primary Race – Feb 05, 2008”. Our Campaigns. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013.
  13. ^ “Our Campaigns – MA State House – Thirty-Second Middlesex – Special Election Race – Mar 04, 2008”. Our Campaigns. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013.
  14. ^ Laidler, John (March 9, 2008). “Newly elected are ready: Two special votes fill House seats”. The Boston Globe.
  15. ^ “Our Campaigns – MA State House – Thirty-Second Middlesex Race – Nov 04, 2008”. Our Campaigns. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013.
  16. ^ “Journal of the House” (PDF). Massachusetts House of Representatives. March 13, 2008. pp. 1154–1155. Archived (PDF) from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  17. ^ “Katherine Clark”. Ballotpedia. Archived from the original on March 21, 2009. Retrieved October 19, 2013.
  18. ^ “Race Details”. Our Campaigns. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013.
  19. ^ “Melrose Primary: Clark wins Senate; Lucas takes GOP nomination in House race”. Melrose Free Press. September 15, 2010. Archived from the original on October 20, 2013. Retrieved July 3, 2013.
  20. ^ “Our Campaigns – MA State Senate – Middlesex & Essex Race – Nov 02, 2010”. Our Campaigns. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013.
  21. ^ “Journal of the Senate”. Massachusetts Senate. January 5, 2011. Archived from the original on February 1, 2014. Retrieved January 20, 2014.
  22. ^ NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts releases voters guide Archived October 18, 2013, at the Wayback Machine“. NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts. August 26, 2010.
  23. ^ “The Pro-Choice Voters Guide”. NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts. Fall 2012. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  24. ^ “We’re Proud to Congratulate Our Endorsed Candidates”. Planned Parenthood Advocacy Fund of Massachusetts, Inc. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  25. ^ Bierman, Noah (May 25, 2011). “Unions soften tone on health: Put positive spin on Senate plan; Bill aims to cut municipal costs”. The Boston Globe.
  26. ^ “Governor Patrick Signs Pension Reform Legislation”. Office of the Governor of Massachusetts (press release). November 18, 2011. Archived from the original on July 2, 2013. Retrieved July 3, 2013.
  27. ^ “MA honors 9 Legislators of Year”. The Massachusetts Municipal Association. January 25, 2012. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved September 18, 2013.
  28. ^ Laforme, William (November 2, 2012). “Clark is MA Police Association’s Legislator of the Year”. Wakefield Patch. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved September 18, 2013.
  29. ^ “Governor Patrick signs legislation to help close achievement gaps in reading and get all students to proficiency by Grade 3”. Office of the Governor of Massachusetts (press release). September 26, 2012.
  30. ^ “Pets and Domestic Violence”. MSPCA-Angell (Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals-Angell Animal Medical Center).
  31. ^ O’Connell, Joe (August 3, 2012). “Patrick signs animal control reform bill in Ashland”. MetroWest Daily News. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved September 18, 2013.
  32. ^ Andersen, Travis (January 28, 2013). “Bill seeks end to strict limit on targets of wiretap law”. The Boston Globe.
  33. ^ “An Act updating privacy protections for personal electronic information”. The 188th General Court of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved September 18, 2013.
  34. ^ Smith, Erin (May 8, 2013). “More info on Level 1 offenders urged”. Boston Herald.
  35. ^ McKim, Jenifer B. (January 24, 2013). “Bill tightens law on sex offenders: Would give public more data”. The Boston Globe.
  36. ^ “WBA Holds Annual Meeting and Newly Admitted Lawyers Reception”. Women’s Bar Association of Massachusetts. March 21, 2013. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved September 18, 2013.
  37. ^ “Member Profile: Katherine Clark”. Massachusetts General Court. Archived from the original on March 22, 2013. Retrieved July 3, 2013.
  38. ^ Miller, Joshua (July 18, 2013). “Coakley backs Katherine Clark in bid for Markey’s seat”. The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on August 3, 2017. Retrieved June 21, 2017.
  39. ^ “EMILY’s List Endorses Katherine Clark for Congress”. EMILY’s List. September 20, 2013. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved September 20, 2013.
  40. ^ Miller, Joshua (October 17, 2013). “Katherine Clark, Frank Addivinola win primaries in race to replace Ed Markey in US House”. The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013.
  41. ^ Schultheis, Emily (October 15, 2013). “Katherine Clark wins Massachusetts special primary”. Politico. Archived from the original on October 16, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013.
  42. ^ “Some Mass. Lawmakers Already Eyeing Markey Seat”. WBUR News. Associated Press. February 22, 2013. Archived from the original on February 25, 2013. Retrieved February 23, 2013.
  43. ^ “Committee Information”. United States House of Representatives. Archived from the original on May 9, 2015. Retrieved January 30, 2014.
  44. ^ Jan, Tracy (June 26, 2014). “Clark on making connections